Archive for the Buildings Category

Serendipity

Posted in abandoned, Blogroll, Book, Buildings, Robin Randle Stories, Where Madness Dwells with tags , , , , , on 09/26/2014 by wooddickinson

From above

Funny how things work. While looking for something completely unrelated I stumbled on the real Reding’s Mill Pool. This public pool was located just outside Joplin, MO in the tiny city of Reding’s Mill. It was a natural spring fed pool and a memorable place from my teen years.

Those of you keeping up with The Robin Randle Stories know this pool is the scene of a horrific event that keeps revisiting Robin in a more and more detailed and correct form. In the book the location of the pool is Mason, TX. I captured the map image and then found a woman who posted photos of the inside. Enjoy this bit of my past twisted into my imagination and ending up in the life of Robin. Enjoy the gallery below and thanks to Roanna Rose for posting these in some wedding pictures!

Work in Progress

Posted in Art, Black and White, Block Island, Buildings, Clouds, Color, Earth, Fine Art Photography, HDR, Holga, Photo Editing, Photography, Trees with tags , , , , , , , , on 08/01/2014 by wooddickinson

Back from Block Island with about a million digital negatives that I shot over the nine-day trip. Right out of the gate I find myself in a conundrum. I found this house that was once a church. I mopeded over to photograph it. At the time it seemed to present a fairly straight forward photograph. Planning on it being a Black & White and all that but then I get back here to Kansas City and when I look at the negative I shot it explodes with all kinds of possible stories.

What to do? The trials of an artist. It’s not like there’s one right answer. So I put it to you. I am attaching the original capture and the original corrected capture. The corrected one has been edited to take out the irritating bending the lens adds to the shot. From there I fell down a rabbit hole. Let me know which one (or none) of these versions works for you. I feel I’m far from done exploring this photograph and it’s just the first of around 1300 negatives! Of for the days of film…

Block Island House-10

Original photo #10

Block Island House-3

Corrected version for lens issues – #3

Block Island House #1

#1

Block Island House-2

#2

Block Island House-4

#4

Block Island House-5

#5

Block Island House-6

#6

Block Island House-7

#7

Block Island House-8

#8

Block Island House-9

#9

An Example

Posted in Art, • Wood Dickinson Sites, Black and White, Buildings, Color, Fine Art Photography, New York City, Photo Editing, Photography, software, workflow with tags , , , , , , , , , , on 07/19/2014 by wooddickinson

I worked on a photo I took in New York City back in 2009. Th image was shot using a Leica M8 digital range finder camera. It was so dark in this entrance to the building that I had to use the highest ISO the camera has. That means noise in the negative. In the film days it meant grain in the negative. All about the same problem.

I tried to salvage the photo by turning it to Black & White but as you can see it didn’t help much.

Now just 5 years later the tools have evolved (along with my skills) to the point that I decided to take another try at it. Using a combination of Lightroom adjustments plus Photoshop retouching with Topaz Clean, Topaz DeNoise and DxO Optics 9 I was able to clean up the noise while keeping image detail. I used Optics 9 to true up the wall and improve the composition.

Then back in Lightroom I turned the image into B&W for final output. All told, two hours to create a greatly improved photograph. I have put the original color capture here along with my original try at a B&W image (2009). The last photograph is the 2014 final version. What can I say?

Original Capture

    Original Capture

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2009 Try

    2009 Try

2014 Final

2014 Final

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Workflow

Posted in Art, • Wood Dickinson Sites, Black and White, Buildings, Color, Fine Art Photography, HDR, Holga, Photography with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on 02/26/2014 by wooddickinson

232004.thbWhen I am working on the post production of a photograph I go through several different options looking for the right one that expresses the image as I see it in my mind. I find this takes several passes through possible treatments of the image. The way I work is to start with the original RAW file in Adobe Lightroom 5. I do some general cropping and possible exposure and white balance correction. My theory is to start with the very best capture of an image, then correct any capture issues and after that begin the process of image deconstruction. I know a lot of people shoot lomo or use lenses like the Lensbaby to create the look they want, but I feel all that can be done in the post processing of an image. That allows me the maximum flexibility while searching for the best representation of the photograph I see in my mind.

When I talk about deconstruction I don’t mean degradation. There is a wide palette of possibilities that include color correction, conversion to B&W, creation of a HDR image, focus manipulation, and so on. In fact the possibilities are so endless that I feel I must try several options before I’m sure I have it right. Below is a photograph I took a few years back in Key West, Florida. That’s right, I shot this a few years ago and I’m just now doing the post work on it. It just took that long for it to “cook” in my brain. I’d look at the original image and just know it wasn’t time to start work on it. I love film but with the tools we have today vs. film workflow I feel I can spend my time much more productively editing rather than worrying about chemical temperatures or air bubbles in the developing tank.

After the Lightroom adjustments are made I take the image into Photoshop to clean up, remove, and prepare the image for editing. Even when I’m working on a shot of an old building or abandoned hallway, I want to remove distracting elements like dangling wires, paint imperfections, damage, etc. You can see by looking at the original image I did do a lot of editing to prepare the photograph for creating the different treatments. This included removal of wires, removing of shadows, elimination of paint imperfections that bothered me and recreating parts of the building lost to time.

Once all this editing is done (about 1 to 2 hours of work) I go back into Lightroom and select filters (like Perfect Photo Suite 8, DxO filters or any one of a number of standalone applications) to get a starting point. I’ll build up layers of different kinds to achieve that “treatment” I’m looking for. I find that “canned” filter settings just don’t get me there. I have to tweak and add and remove stuff until I get what I’m looking for. This process can take another 1 to 2 hours and sometime more. At the end of the process I usually have anywhere from 2 to 5 hours in on an image before I call it done.

Below is the original RAW image as shot, followed by my treatment. I have added two possible B&W treatments and an optional color treatment. I passed through all of these, getting to the final one. Now you can be the judge. Did I get it right or is one of the alternate treatments better?

227 original

This is the original image.

test 227.1 s

My Original Treatment

test 227.4 s

One possible B&W Treatment (#1)

test 227.2 s

Another B&W Treatment (#2)

test 227.3 s

Another Color Treatment (#3)

Fear

Posted in Art, Buildings, Color, Fear, Fine Art Photography, Hope, Monsters, Need, Photography, TV, Writing with tags , , , , , , , , on 01/22/2014 by wooddickinson

TSH Window-3Fear has been with us from the begging of our existence. Fear is a healthy response to places, people and situations that could lead to injury or an untimely death.

The funny thing about fear is the fact that in real life we shun it but in our fantasy life we embrace it. I have a lot of friends that tell me they can’t wait until the next slasher movie comes out. They read horror novels, watch television programs designed to elicit fear and terror in viewers not thinking about the true horror that runs through our daily lives.

Things like school shootings, airplanes coming close to diving off a cliff when landing not to mention the blizzards and extreme temps we have been experiencing this month. Weather can bring out the worst in people as they fight for supplies before the storm arrives.steps c copy

As an artist I’m charged with some responsibility to at least try and make some sense of this irrational conundrum. Fear is fine as long as it’s not real or it’s not me. Cross either line and all bets are off. I’m not going to delve into the psychology of this. I’m going to offer a couple of pieces I’ve done recently that, for me, pick at that boundary between the real and not so real.

Stay warm. Hope you have gas for your generator and some bread to eat.

100 in 365 version 2.0 soft cover edition

Posted in 100 in 365, Art, • Wood Dickinson Sites, Black and White, Book, Buildings, Cape Cod, Chicago, Clouds, Color, Fine Art Photography, Fog, HDR, Holga, New York City, Patti Dickinson, Photography, Puerto Vallarta, Sunsets, Trains, Trees with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on 11/20/2013 by wooddickinson

Out now. The soft cover edition of 100 in 365 version 2.0. To look and buy click HERE.

100 in 365 version 2.0

Broken Wall

Posted in Abstract, Art, • Wood Dickinson Sites, Buildings, Color, Fear, HDR, Kansas City, Monsters, Photography with tags , , , , , , , on 07/18/2013 by wooddickinson
Study of a broken wall.

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